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Femur fractures in the wake of a high-impact car accident

One of the most serious injuries that a car accident can lead to is a femur fracture. The femur being the strongest bone in the human body, it won’t normally break except in a high-impact crash. Such crashes, Pennsylvania residents should know, can lead to other conditions. Victims may:

• Tear muscles and ligaments
• Damage blood vessels
• Run the risk for infection

That last becomes a real possibility when the femur protrudes from the skin. In any event, victims will likely need immediate medical attention, or they may die from blood loss or the development of blood clots like deep vein thrombosis.

Where the femur can be fractured

There are three sections where the fracture can occur. At the top is the femoral head and neck, which attach to the hip. Hip fractures are seen more among the elderly when they fall, and they tend to be stress fractures, not complete. Crash victims tend to break the midsection, called the femoral shaft, or the end that attaches to the knee, called the distal end. The injuries can be complete and lead to displacement.

Medical treatments can be extensive

To repair the femur, doctors may need to surgically implant a metal rod and screws into it. Metal plates are often used in the case of knee fractures. Victims may need physical therapy and rehabilitative care to regain leg strength.

For those injured through another’s negligence

When car accidents are clearly the fault of the other driver, those injured can file a claim and, if all goes well, be compensated for their injuries and all future medical expenses relating to them. Pennsylvania is a no-fault state, so not everyone can file a third-party claim. To see what your options are, consider seeing a lawyer. The lawyer may speak on your behalf at the negotiation table, too.

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