Driverless cars have taken the public’s imagination by storm. It seems like almost everyday that there is a new story that highlights the future for this new technology. Some of the world’s richest and well-known companies are investing a great deal of money on autonomous vehicles.

One analyst predicted a road full of self-driving cars in as soon as 20 years. Car manufacturers and taxi services are preparing themselves for this future. Uber says its entire fleet will be autonomous by 2030. There are indications, however, that driverless cars may not be as close on the horizon as some believe. All this hype and anticipation is not unlike what was said of electric cars not too long ago and many of the predictions regarding the adoption of electric cars turned out to be vastly premature. Electric cars are still too limited and too expensive. While people are definitely intrigued by self-driving cars, many are also skeptical.

The mass adoption of this technology will require new regulations and laws at both the federal and state level. Ethical questions such as what should an AV do when presented with the option of hurting a bystander versus its occupants are worrying some observers as well.

While their proponents believe that self-driving cars will dramatically cut down on the number of car accidents, there is always a chance that there will be software glitches. Until that time, however, human error will continue to be the cause of the vast majority of collisions. People who have been injured in a wreck caused by the negligence of another driver might want to have an attorney attempt to obtain a favorable settlement from the at-fault motorist’s insurer.