When it comes to trucks entering the roadway, there are all sizes and types of commercial trucks. Some hauling freight, some hauling livestock, others hauling equipment or goods. Whatever the need, most things are hauled on trucks at some point in their supply chain. Some companies do hauling in-house, while others outsource to 3rd party businesses that will do the shipping and receiving for them.

This is where logo liability comes into play. Logo liability pertains to 3rd party shipping companies (such as FedEx or UPS) who use independent contractors to deliver the goods. Because they are independent contractors, they are not considered employees and, thus, are not protected or vouched for by the company itself in terms of liability. Logo liability is a way to pin liability back on the employer in cases of personal injury caused by their independent contractor.

You’ve seen shipping trucks with the logo on the side of the truck or van. This is how liability can be tied back to the company. The location of the accident can have a huge impact on the ways that a company can be held accountable for an independent contractor’s actions in causing a truck accident. Case law pertaining to the jurisdiction can help to set the precedent that could be used to seek damages.

In short, a company hiring an independent contractor is not entirely off the hook for actions committed by the contractor. There can be ways to tie the contractor back to the larger company. This would then offer a higher breadth of potential damages. This is good news for those who have been impacted by truck accidents.